Bristol Somali Media Group

Home » Africa » Muslim Brotherhood: Hope for political Islam

Muslim Brotherhood: Hope for political Islam

Archives

Categories

Gravatar: Profile

(BSMGIslam is a tolerant, inclusive and a just religion which has been hijacked by mad men which have enjoyed Western publicity. Whatever their reasons, these media organisations have not shown Islam as the religion of peace that it is. The Muslim Brotherhood and their leader Dr. Mohammed Morsi today have a golden opportunity to once again rebuild, unite and develop a once great nation with legitimate public mandate

(29 June 2012 — BSMG) Some were upset and angry by the result. Some even claimed the results were fixed because the Muslim Brotherhood had claimed to burn Egypt to the ground if they did not win. However, after the votes were counted there was a clear winner. The Muslim brotherhood’s Dr. Mohammed Morsi has become the first winner of the first ever fair and free elections held in Egypt by beating his rival, the former Prime Minister, Ahmed Shafiq by more than 900,000 votes to secure 51.7% of the popular vote. Some critics within Egypt are suggesting that because of the closeness of the result, there should be a recount but the result has already been announced and endorsed by the highest authorities in Egypt. In any case in some of the most established democracies around the world elections have been won with lesser votes.

The Muslim Brotherhood victory was not a total surprise as they had been ahead in most polls since the revolution that ousted the tyrant Hosni Mubarak, and their main rival was a former Mubarak Minister and friend. What was a surprise was Morsi’s response to the peoples trust in his future regime which put to bed any stereotypical ignorant speculations of an autocratic Islamic Egypt which will be led by a party with a thirst for vengeance after a near half century of oppression under the hands of military despots. He assured Egypt that he will be a president for all Egyptians regardless of their differences and he acknowledged that his position was only possible with the courage of those who took part in the revolution for reform. He still has an issue with the Military which still retains enormous crucial executive powers but this is not a battle he will win quickly nor easily. It is not one he should take personally either as regardless of the victor they would have done the same.

The jubilation of the masses in Tahrir Square was witnessed globally. However, Mr. Morsi, an academic and a lifelong social activist who has woken up in Mubarak’s prisons many times, is well aware of the need to not follow the path of the oppressor. He also realises that action speak louder than words and has promised to immediately get on with his job. What would support him most in winning over the Egyptian people is his own success as he was born a peasant and today through academic rigour and his own personal qualities achieved the highest office in Egypt fairly in an open contest.

Despite the standoff with the Military over key future constitutional issues, deteriorating internal security and Egypt’s dire economic state, Dr. Morsi takes office at a time when he is able to exploit western guilt over their support for Hosni Mubarak’s long regime and the need to adapt to and work with many Islamist governments in the newly democratised Arab spring nations. If the Western governments especially that of America, do not engage well with his government then the Chinese are always more than willing to assist as they currently are all over the African continent.

Egypt needs jobs, national reconciliation and an agenda for inter-community cohesion. The next government should reflect the best of the Egyptian political establishment and this diversity will be the only way to unite and dispel the fears of an autocratic Islamic Brotherhood forged by decades of Mubarak regime propaganda and western fears of political Islam. Morsi has already promised this and only a politically suicidal Brotherhood objection can prevent this.

The Muslim Brotherhood has welcomed Egypt to a new age of freedom. The lessons of their many decades of oppression should help them to govern more justly, with greater consensus and common purpose. Assuming that the military does not stand in the way of these, the Morsi government should help to create a constitution which strengthens the rule of law and inclusive state institutions which work within the framework designed by a government that is accountable to the electorate. Public concerns should be at the heart of future policy making and transparency in both national and local government should be made a government priority. The Muslim Brotherhood can avoid Mubarak’s rambling desperate and out of touch last speech which set to portray him as a heroic father of the nation who had sacrificed so much at great cost to himself for his people by simply listening and acting on the public’s priorities and concerns where possible.  Without doubt if this is done, Morsi and his party would secure their own political futures and oversee Egypt’s rebirth as a nation of standing in the world.

Islam is a tolerant, inclusive and just religion which has been hijacked by mad men which have enjoyed Western publicity. Whatever their reasons, these media organisations have not shown Islam as the religion of peace that it is. The Muslim Brotherhood and their leader Dr. Mohammed Morsi today have a golden opportunity to once again rebuild, unite and develop a once great nation with legitimate public mandate. They will not have the tools of torture favoured for silencing critics and dissidents by their predecessor but what they have is the opportunity to show case the tolerance of the much feared political Islam. If they do their job properly, the rewards will be enormous and their influence and ideology global.

Liban Obsiye.

Email: libanbakaa@hotmail.com  Twitter: @LibanObsiye

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Join us on Facebook

%d bloggers like this: